Living Water, Clean Water Initiative 1

Our no longer orphan Granddaughter was born here in one of the typical mud huts.

She is old and can only carry a small amount up the hill

At Gurane Village Ethiopia and surrounding communities water access is…….challenging.

The river is too far and the watering hole becomes only a muddy puddle when rain is scarce.

Will you help us bring Living water and clean water to Gurane?

Living water in the form of an educated, trained pastor who can teach God’s word and help us facilitate construction of a water well and other matters?

$1,600 U. S. pays the pastor for two years after which he should be self supporting.

$1,500 U. S.  will dig the well and install a hand pump.

Our past fund raising endeavors have always resulted in more cost than revenue. We are looking for 31 people to contribute $100.00 each.

Will you help these precious ladies? And the children? Click “donate” in the right column.


It is a long walk and the water is DIRTY

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Clean Water, Living Water

 

Dogachow and Zerihun Tebebu with Charlie

October fifth 2010 Ethiopian Child will embark on a journey to Ethiopia. There Charlie will meet up with Alayu Kebede. The two will deliver clean water by introducing Sawyer Point One water filters to the people of a small, remote village. Mr. Kebede is an Ethiopian man who works for Blair Foundation to introduce the word of God to villages in his native land. He will introduce the “living” water of the gospel (John 7:38) and interpret for Charlie who will deliver and demonstrate the filters for “clean” water.

The village is near Debre Tsige, North of the capital city of Addis Ababa in the heart of the area where the Oromo people live. Three teen age boys, Zerihun, Wondeson and Dogachow Tebebu have lived there eight years with no mother or father.

It is also planned to honor the people who have helped the boys survive by sharing a traditional Ethiopian meal with them.

It is a ninety minute walk to Debre Tsige and there are times when the Jemma River valley is flooded and they are not able to cross to town. Half way to town is the dirty stream where all their drinking water comes from.

Zerihun, now nearly eighteen, has expressed a desire to open a “shop” in the village, where he can sell needed goods to people not only in the village where they live but to others in the vicinity. We will help make that happen if, when we explore the possibilities, it seems feasible.

We will also deliver story books, clothes, medicines, bandages, school supplies and visit LeaMcD Educational Services for the deaf of Ethiopia.